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April 10th, 2014

Do you hate updating your passwords whenever there’s a new hack?

Advice about changing passwords from AVAST.

Change your passwords as a precaution against the Heartbleed bug.

We reported yesterday about the serious Heartbleed  bug which allows hackers to steal encryption keys from nearly two-thirds of all websites.

“This is probably the worst bug discovered this year. We believed in the security of SSL/TLS, and now discover that it comes with a hole that allows anyone to read our personal information such as passwords, cookies or even server’s private keys,” said Jiri Sejtko, Director of the AVAST Virus Lab. “We, as end users, simply can’t do anything, but make sure we are as secure as possible.”

That means changing your passwords. Again.

If just thinking about changing all your passwords makes you want to jump out the window, then here are a few tricks to help make it a little less painful. At the end of this post, we’ll share a tip on how to make password creation, as well as remembering them all, as easy-as-pie. So go all the way to the end. ;)

Why do cybercrooks want your password?

It takes serious effort to hijack accounts, so there must be some payoff at the end for cybercrooks.  Obviously, it’s not to get your vacation photos. Money is the most common motivation. Your money.

There are many ways of turning stolen data into money, but one of them is worth highlighting. Research shows that 55% of us reuse passwords on different sites. It is likely that you use the same password for Facebook  that you use for your bank account.  This means that cybercrooks can steal your money much easier. Never use the same passwords on different sites, especially for really important services.

Password basics

1. Use a random collection of letters (uppercase and lowercase), numbers and symbols

2. Make it 8 characters or longer

3. Create a unique password for every account

Tricks and tips

Maximum password security requires at least seven characters, a mix of upper and lower case, a few symbols, and a sense of humor.

Create an acronym using a meaningful, easy-to-remember piece of information. Use a sentence like My wedding anniversary is 28 December, 2001. That phrase turns into this password, Mwai28/Dec.01.

Many sites require a special symbol like ` ~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ – + = { } [ ] \ | : ; ” ‘ < > , . ? /. Use some of those to replace letters. Your password can be this, M<>ai28/Dec.0!.

Read more…

Categories: General, How to Tags: , ,
April 9th, 2014

Heartbleed affects much of internet. Time to change your passwords again.

Heartbleed security threat scares internetThe security community is buzzing with news of a threat called Heartbleed. The bug reportedly affects nearly two-thirds of all websites, including Yahoo Mail, OKCupid, WeTransfer, and others. The bug takes advantage of a vulnerability in OpenSSL, an open-source protocol used to encrypt vast portions of the web. It allows cybercrooks to steal encryption keys, usernames and passwords, financial data and other sensitive data they have no right to.

In a blog post to their users, Tumblr described it this way,

…that the little lock icon (HTTPS) we all trusted to keep our passwords, personal emails, and credit cards safe, was actually making all that private information accessible to anyone who knew about the exploit.

The latest version of OpenSSL fixes the problem and websites are already upgrading.

However, your popular social site, your company’s site, commerce site, hobby site, sites you download software from or even sites run by your government might be using vulnerable OpenSSL, warns Codenomicon on their site about Heartbleed. GitHub compiled a list of sites that are vulnerable, but some may have already been updated. AVAST’s website is safe from the Heartbleed threat.

You can check a site’s vulnerability status at the Heartbleed test site which enables users to enter domains. If a site comes back as an “uh-oh” but doesn’t say “heartbleed” then there may be something else wrong, but it’s not Heartbleed. Update: AVAST’s COO, Ondrek Vlcek recommends this checker, https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html.

What can you do?

The best advice is to stay away from affected sites for a while. In their report on Heartbleed, Tor advises, “If you need strong anonymity or privacy on the Internet, you might want to stay away from the Internet entirely for the next few days while things settle.”

You need to change your passwords for any vulnerable sites as well. Once affected sites start making the updates, they will most likely advise their customers to change their passwords. Earlier today, Tumblr sent their users a note encouraging them to change passwords to all their online accounts immediately.

“This might be a good day to call in sick and take some time to change your passwords everywhere — especially your high-security services like email, file storage, and banking, which may have been compromised by this bug,” Tumblr said on their blog.

We have written tips about creating strong passwords in the avast! blog. Read My password was stolen. What do I do now? as a reminder.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+. Business owners – check out our business products.

Categories: General Tags: , ,
April 8th, 2014

[2014] April Fools’ Day joke in AVAST – prank for COO and CTO

We prepared a special office equipment for our COO and CTO this year on 1st April. They didn’t expect that we were able to prepare better prank than last year. This year the prank consisted of several stages

  1. office moved to a new location
  2. office filled up with balloons
  3. hints of new office location hidden in different locations in AVAST’s offices

 

The whole preparation took a lot of hours. But the final state of the offices was worth it…

DSCN7248

img_7557

Ondrej Vlcek’s (COO) office

Read more…

Categories: General, Uncategorized Tags:
April 7th, 2014

New AVAST survey shows people not so smart with smartphone security.

Smartphone owners are careless about security, says survey.

Guys are more likely to get a virus on their smartphone than girls (36% vs 32%), and more than one third (34%) of survey respondents don’t have any anti-theft or antivirus security on their smartphones. Add to that nearly half of the people AVAST polled in the US said they did not back up their data or know if they did on their mobile devices. This is despite nearly one in ten saying they had lost their phone or it was stolen in the last 12 months. These results are from a recent smartphone survey conducted for antivirus software company, AVAST.

AVAST Software mobile security survey

AVAST surveyed 9,060 people earlier this year in the US about smartphone ownership and use and have released the results today. Read more…

April 5th, 2014

How do I fix an incorrect Microsoft Action Center warning?

howto2_enQuestion of the week: After the latest avast! update, I got a warning from the Microsoft Action Center that my antivirus is not working. It is working fine. How can I get this warning to go away?

The Microsoft Action Center is a central place to view important messages about security and maintenance and take actions that can help your Windows machine run smoothly. If an item is red, that indicates a significant issue that should be addressed soon, such as an outdated antivirus program that needs updating.

Windows regularly checks to see if an antivirus program is installed on your computer, that it’s running, and that it’s up to date. The status of your antivirus program is displayed in Windows Action Center or Security Center. However, Windows does not detect all antivirus programs.

AVAST Evangelist, Bob G., created a new video that shows an easy fix when you get the Microsoft Action Center message that there is a problem with your antivirus protection.

Microsoft also has instructions to specify that you are using an antivirus program that Windows doesn’t find.

Check out other tutorial videos that Bob has created on YouTube.

Ask a question

If you have a question about any of AVAST’s products, please send them to wannabesocial@avast.com. If we answer your question, we will send you an avast! Teddy Bear.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+. Business owners – check out our business products.

April 3rd, 2014

How to reset your avast! Administration Console password

When Albert Schweitzer said “Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory” he could not have possibly known how unhappy future Systems Administrators would be when they have a scheduled maintenance window to deploy anti-virus clients throughout the domain, only to realize that the password to log into the console has been forgotten. If this is happening to you,  it may provide you some comfort in knowing that I’ve been there, but luckily enough for me (and you, my forgetful friend), there’s a pretty easy way out of a potentially disastrous situation. With that being said, it brings me great pleasure to publish a guide on a topic of which I am so familiar.

“Enough about your bad memory! How can I reset my password already?!” You say?
Well that depends on which console you’re using. If you’re using SOA, read below. If you’re using EA, click here to jump straight to it. Regardless, be sure to be logged in with administrative privileges, as they will be required.

How to reset the password for avast! Small Office Administrator

To reset the Small office Administrator password, enter the following into a command prompt:

“C:\Program Files\AVAST Software\Administration Console\Avast.Sbc.Service.exe” –c password -p NewPassword

…where:

“C:\Program Files\AVAST Software\Administration Console\Avast.Sbc.Service.exe” is the installation path to the file. And –c password –p NewPassword are the application switches. Do leave –c password intact, but change the newpassword field to the password of your choice.
If the application cannot be found from its default installation path, simply search for it from the Start menu, and when you’ve found it, right click it and go to properties. The fields target and location will provide the full path, though you will have to add the file name [Avast.Sbc.Service.exe] and the switches described above to the end.

 The results should look like this: The screenshot below will change the password to “NewPassword”

b1

If you have entered the command successfully, you’ll get the confirmation message below. Read more…

Categories: How to, SMB/Business Tags:
April 2nd, 2014

Declaring machine war against malicious Android packages

machine_war_theme_jpg

Do you know the notion “machine war”? If you’re a fan of the Matrix movie trilogy then probably, yes. It denotes the fictional rise of artificially intelligent machines against the human race and their violent conquest of human beings. We want to apply a similar dominance of computationally powerful machines, not to create a population of slaves, but against numerous malicious Android packages that wildly proliferate on unofficial markets.

The idea of malware detection with no human interaction appeared earlier on our blog. In a fundamental article about AVAST research activities by AVAST’s COO, Ondřej Vlček, he effectively described the technologies we employ to deal with Windows threats. Two techniques have been mentioned explicitly, Malware Similarity Search and Evo-Gen, both working with Windows PE file format. Sometimes the latter form of detection technique is denoted as weak automated anti-malware heuristic.

The main effort is to reach two slightly conflicting qualities at the same time: The robustness, which means that suggested methods cover as many threats as possible; and simplicity, so that the methods are easily implemented in AVAST’s mobile security solution. The search for balance between those qualities is assisted by lessons learned from automated heuristic for Windows PE executables.

Read more…

April 1st, 2014

Email with subject “FW:Bank docs” leads to information theft

In this blogpost we will look deep into a spam campaign, where unlike other possible scenarios, the victim is infected by opening and running an email attachment. In the beginning of this year, we blogged about a spam campaign with a different spam message – a fake email from the popular WhatsApp messenger. This time we will look at spam email which tries to convince the victim that it originates from his bank. The malicious email contains contents similar to the following one:


Subject: FW: Bank docs

We have received this documents from your bank, please review attached documents.
<name, address>

 

promo Read more…

March 31st, 2014

The Gray-zone of malware detection in Android OS

Does the title of this blog post have a mysterious meaning? Not exactly.

In this first part about the gray-zone of Android malware detections, I will introduce the Android:SecApk, a detection regarding the protection that the App Shield (Bangcle) offers to Android applications (.apk). This detection has a big sample set that is still growing. Some SecApk wrapped samples that existed or still exist in the Google Play Store and third party stores, can be seen in the table below.

MD5

Name \ Info

F1EF5B8C671B2146C2A2454ECF775E47

G锁屏冰雪奇缘之来自星星的你V1.0.apk

\ PUP – An application to promote a specific movie. Potentially unwanted because of the extended permissions that was requested.

Current Status: Removed from Google Play

10bd28d4f56aff83cb6d31b6db8fdbd2

Cut_the_bird.apk

\PUP – A game that have potentially unwanted permissions that they can drive to loss of private personal info.

05ffb6f34e40bb1cf8f9628e5647d5e3

aini1314langmanzhutisuoping_V2.5_mumayi_700e0.apk

\PUP – A screensaver application that has permissions unrelated with the purpose of the app.

d6b40bbb79b54c09352a2e0824c0adba

3D职业乒乓球.apk

\Pup – This application is a tennis game. Potentially unwanted because of the extended permissions that was requested.

eefd2101e6a0b016e5a1e9859e9c443e

eefd2101e6a0b016e5a1e9859e9c443e.apk

\Malware – This app steal personal data and SMS messages from the user.

 

The App Shield is an online service that, after a submission of an .apk, encrypts it and adds some layers of protection. The procedure of the encryption and protection of the apk will be discussed with more detail during the course of the second part of this blog post.

Starting with the submission process, a clean app named AvstTest.apk uploaded to the service. The exported .apk was renamed as AvstTest[SecApk].apk. In addition, apktool and dex2jar used accordingly to decode the .apk resources and convert the ‘.dex’ files to ‘.jar’.

Folder structure

  Read more…

March 31st, 2014

Backup your phones and PCs on World BackUp Day!

Your world is on your mobile devices and PC: Your family photos, home videos, documents and emails. Unfortunately, you can lose it in an instance. For those folks who haven’t backed up their files, that means disaster. Today is World BackUp Day. Be prepared. Backup your files on March 31st.
backup_img

Did you know?

  • 113 cellphones are lost or stolen every minute of every day
  • More men (60%) than women (47%) frequently back up their data
  • Women are more at risk than men if their smartphone is stolen or lost, because they do not protect their personal data and information as well as men do.

back-up men_women
Back up your Android phone or tablet

Malware is a growing threat to the Android platform, but because of the small size of our devices, loss and theft is still the bigger threat. Men are more careful about the safety and security of their cellphones than women. We learned that curious fact from an avast! survey conducted last summer,  Lost or Stolen Smartphone: The Consequences are Bigger for Women Than for Men.

avast! Mobile BackUp is available for Android phones and tablets and comes in two different versions.

  1. 1. The standalone free version provides you with basic backup options: Contacts, text messages, pictures, and call logs.
  2. 2. If you would like to backup music, video, and apps, then you need to buy the Premium version. This can be done later, from within the free version.

Get free avast! Mobile BackUp from Google Play. After you install avast! Mobile BackUp, your current data will be backed up to your AVAST Account and Google Drive.

Back up your PC

avast! BackUp is an online backup and recovery service that allows you to backup your entire computer or select sets of data or individual files you want to back up. You can choose the storage capacity you need, and for a few bucks a month, rest assured that your files are safe in case disaster strikes.

Try avast! BackUp free for 30 days. During that time, you’ll get 25 GB for your files.

March 31st is World Backup Day. Take the pledge now, then take action:

I solemnly swear to backup my important documents and precious memories on March 31st.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+. Business owners – check out our business products.