David Fišer

David Fišer

3 September 2015

Tiny Banker hidden in modified WinObj tool from Sysinternals

The Tiny Banker Trojan is spread by email attachments.

Tiny Banker aka Tinba Trojan made a name for itself targeting banking customers worldwide. The Avast Virus Lab first analyzed the malware found in the Czech Republic reported in this blog post, Tinybanker Trojan targets banking customers. It didn't take long for the malware to spread globally attacking customers from various banking behemoths such as Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and RBC Royal Bank, which we wrote about in Tiny Banker Trojan targets customers of major banks worldwide.

This time we will write about a campaign targeting customers of Polish financial institutions. The Trojan is spread by email attachments pretending to be pictures. The examples of email headers are shown in the following image.

email

In fact, there are executable files in the zip attachments - IMG-0084(JPEG).JPEG.exe, fotka 1.jpeg.exe. The interesting thing is that the binary looks almost like regular WinObj tool from Systernals, however there are differences: The original version of WinObj has a valid digital signature. The malware doesn't have any.

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Threat Research, Security News

David Fišer

27 October 2014

Pony stealer spread vicious malware using email campaign

Most people want to stay on top of their bills, and not pay them late. But recently, unexpected emails claiming an overdue invoice have been showing up in people's inboxes, causing anxiety and ultimately a malware attack. Read this report from the Avast Virus Lab, so as a consumer you'll know what to look for, and as a systems administrator for an SMB or other website, you will know how cybercrooks can use your site for this type of social engineering scam.

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Security News, SMB/Business

David Fišer

15 September 2014

Tiny Banker Trojan targets customers of major banks worldwide

The Tinba Trojan aka Tiny Banker targeted Czech bank customers this summer; now it's gone global.

After an analysis of a payload distributed by Rig Exploit kit, the AVAST Virus Lab identified a payload as Tinba Banker. This Trojan targets a large scope of banks like Bank of America, ING Direct, and HSBC.

hsbc_bank

In comparison with our previous blogpost, Tinybanker Trojan targets banking customers, this variant has some differences, which we will describe later.

How does Tiny Banker work?

  1. 1. The user visits a website infected with the Rig Exploit kit (Flash or Silverlight exploit).
  2. 2. If the user's system is vulnerable, the exploit executes a malicious code that downloads and executes the malware payload, Tinba Trojan.
  3. 3. When the computer is infected and the user tries to log in to one of the targeted banks, webinjects come into effect and the victim is asked to fill out a form with his/her personal data.
  4. 4. If he/she confirms the form, the data is sent to the attackers. This includes credit card information, address, social security number, etc. An interesting field is “Mother’s Maiden Name”, which is often used as a security question to reset a password.
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Threat Research, Security News

David Fišer

27 March 2014

Pretty women. Which one will infect you?

which_one_will_infect_you

Malware which opens pictures of attractive women to entice its victims has been around for some time. Last month there were more than usual, so I decided to research malware that pretends to be a regular picture, and the results are pretty interesting.

We looked for executable samples with two distinct characteristics: 1. .jpg in their name, and 2. no older than the last three months. About 6,000 unique files which matched this criteria were found. From these samples, we noticed that pretending to be an image is not a family specific criteria but we identified that Win32:Zbot is represented more than other malware e.g. MSIL:Bladabindi-EV, Win32:Banker-JXB,BV:Bicololo-CY, etc.

The important message is that most of these samples are distributed by scams which are sent by email or posted on social media sites. An example of an email scam is pictures below. If you are interested in what the social media scam looks like and how to protect yourself, you should read one of our previous blog posts.

scam_mails

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Tips, Threat Research, Security News

David Fišer

12 December 2013

Christmas time! Do you want a malware present?

DHLspoofChristmas time is essentially connected with buying presents. There's a lot of stuff to be done and a lot of opportunities to buy a present in an e-shop to save time. Who doesn't know someone who buys a Christmas gift online?

The malware authors know and are very keen to take advantage of it. We see scam emails containing order or delivery details every day and they have a lot of common. In fact, it's nothing new. Such methods are used constantly during the year, it's nothing special connected to Christmas. However, Christmas is the reason why many people might be fooled. Let's look at them in detail.

Imagine you are customer waiting for a present to be delivered. You get anxious and check your email waiting for order details. You are probably the most vulnerable at this time. Then you get an email from DHL, the well-known parcel delivery service, with a notice saying that the shipping details are in an attachment. In that moment of relief, you click on the email attachment. It turns out to be a zip file containing a file named DHL-parcel.exe. The strange thing is the file extension looks like regular PDF file because it has the same icon. In fact, it is malware.

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Threat Research, Security News

David Fišer

22 May 2013

Grum lives!

 

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Threat Research, Security News