Protecting over 230 million PCs, Macs, & Mobiles – more than any other antivirus

Archive

Archive for the ‘Android corner’ Category
August 18th, 2014

A look into the future of mobile hacks

crystal ball 1

Mobile malware is maturing quicker than PC threats did.

Mobile malware analyst Filip Chytry looks into his crystal ball and predicts where cybercrooks are headed next.

The majority of mobile malware AVAST has in its database comes from unofficial app stores. As we wrote about in The Fine Line between Malicious and Innocent Apps, infiltrating official app markets like Google Play is rather difficult. Therefore, it is very likely that mobile malware authors will look for other ways to hack mobile devices, which contain a plethora of valuable and sensitive information.

App servers and base transceiver stations (BTS), which enable communication between mobile networks and devices, will most likely be targeted next by mobile hackers. Man-in-the-middle attacks via app servers mean that mobile hackers may redirect communication between mobile app users and the app’s server or infect app users’ by pushing malware onto user devices via the apps on their devices.

Mobile operators should be prepared for a BTS attack, as this may be possible in the near future. Not only would hackers be able to spread malware to mobile users via a BTS attack, but infected BTS could re-route all incoming mobile data.

Another possibility is that hackers could intercept communication between mobile users and app servers. Hackers could retrieve banking details if they intercept the communication between a user completing a transaction using a mobile banking app.

Mobile malware is in its infancy; at the moment comparable to a toddler. Mobile users, security providers, app markets, and mobile operators should brace themselves for the teenage version of mobile attacks.

AVAST will continue to be one step ahead of mobile malware authors, protecting avast! Mobile Security users from malware and other mobile security risks. Download avast! Mobile Security for free.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+. Business owners – check out our business products.

August 16th, 2014

Facebook Messenger app stirs privacy pot

Lately, you may have noticed that when you try to send messages through Facebook’s mobile app on your phone and tablet, you are prompted to download the standalone Facebook Messenger app. It’s a cool app which allows you to message your Facebook friends, send picture and video messages, and call any of your Facebook friends for free using your Wi-Fi connection. It has also stirred up some controversy about all the permissions it requires.

avast! Mobile Security protects your Android device

Messenger needs permission to take pictures and videos using your camera, record audio, directly call phone numbers, receive/send/read/edit your text messages, access the internet, look into your address book, and keep track of your precise location. When we take a look at the permissions listed on the Google Play store, there are other creepy, but not really threatening, things like preventing your phone from sleeping and controlling the vibration.

The privacy controversy that is stirring is around the question of what Facebook may do with all that data. For example, do they really need to see your address book? Don’t they already know who your friends are on Facebook?

The thing is – nothing has changed about Facebook Messenger permissions. The previous version required the same access as the standalone app. You can read Facebook’s explanation about the permissions here.

We wrote about the changes in the way Google Play manages permissions earlier this summer, pointing out that most people blindly accept whatever app developers want without question. Each of us needs to decide how much we are willing to give in order to get. But please be aware, dear avast! users, that your smartphone combined with social media is a mecca for hackers. Our lives in data are stored on our mobile devices and without strong security and some common sense, cybercrooks can harvest it and use it as they please.

Make sure you protect your devices with the proper security. avast! Mobile Security is for Android phones and tablets, and it’s free. The Application Shield keeps you safe from malicious apps by scanning them on two levels – on installation and on execution. With App manager you can see your running apps, check their permissions, and if they display ads. Download avast! Mobile Security & Anti-theft from the Google Play store.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ andInstagram. Business owners – check out our business products.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments off
August 14th, 2014

The Fine Line between Malicious and Innocent Apps: Part 2

Malware has increased on mobile devices 900% since 2011. As dramatic as that number is, as we explained in part 1 of this post, your Android device is unlikely to become infected with malicious malware.

Nowadays, cybercrooks use more subtle and insidious techniques to steal money and personal data from you.

hungry-ads

We explained about PUPs and snoopy apps that want too much information from you. Here are a few more sneaky methods that you should be aware of:

Information hungry ads

App developers are not the only information hungry players in the app game. Ad kits can be found in 80% of free apps. Ads are used to monetize free apps, just like websites display ads to monetize. Unfortunately, not all ad networks play fair. Some ad networks collect and share your personal data.

At the beginning of the year Rovio, maker of Angry Birds, came under fire for allegedly sharing user information with the NSA. They, however, denied this and stated that Ad Networks used by “millions of commercial websites and mobile applications” leaked information to the U.S. intelligence agency.

avast! Mobile Premium, the premium version of avast! Mobile Security, includes an Ad Detector feature. This feature provides full details of an ad network’s capabilities. Ad network permissions are mixed in with the app’s permissions, so it is difficult to differentiate where certain information is being sent and who is accessing your device. App downloaders should therefore always review app permissions thoroughly, as app developers are not the only players on the app’s field.

Empty promise apps

There are apps on the market that are not after your personal data, but are more interested in deceiving you for financial gain. These apps trick people into downloading something different than what they advertised. There are various ways this can be done with various levels of severity.

The most innocent of them being seemingly normal apps that when downloaded only display ads, not even offering the service they advertised. We found apps like this around the time of the World Cup. Games like Corner Kick World Cup 2014 displayed a white screen with ads popping up now and then. This is not necessarily malicious, but frustrating and annoying for the user. If the app had been called Ad Roulette it would be acceptable, but app developers gain a small profit from advertisers when users click on ads displayed within their app. Displaying ads continuously boosts the likelihood that users will click on the ads, thus increasing the app developer’s profit.

More malicious and misleading apps warn people that their device is infected, deceiving them into downloading either an app to remove the “virus” on their device or in some cases downloading actual malware. AVAST discovered an adult app, available on an underground app market that forced users to “scan their device for viruses.”. Subsequently, the app displayed a fake version of avast! Mobile Security, which in reality was ransomware that locked victim’s out of their devices until they paid up.

Apps that gain users by offering a solution to remove non-existent infections, on the other hand, may offer a legitimate app, like a security or other category of app, but the tactic they use to gain users is deceitful and unethical.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ andInstagram. Business owners – check out our business products.

Comments off
August 14th, 2014

Calling advanced Android users: Join the avast! Mobile Security Beta test!

Would you like a sneak-peek into our new version of avast! Mobile Security before the official product release? The opportunity is here.  We are looking for advanced Android users to participate in the avast! Mobile Security Beta test. This Beta test will run until August 31, so you have plenty of time to test everything. Your valuable feedback will be incorporated into our product before going public to millions of users, so your participation is vital.

Help our development team by being  part of the beta testing team. We need your input! :)

avast! Mobile Security beta testing

Android beta testers are vital to the success of avast! Mobile Security. Join the team!


Here’s how to join the avast! Mobile Security Beta test:

What we expect from you?

  • Provide us with your feedback on the new interface, with a special focus on graphical issues and issues with translations
  • Report all potential bugs you find, preferably with print screens
  • Give us your suggestions for improvements, additional features, and solutions

Where you can submit your feedback?

Every active participant who provides feedback will receive a 1-year avast! Mobile Premium license.

The new interface has already received praised from beta testers. We want to hear from you. Join the Google+ Mobile Security beta testers community now.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ andInstagram. Business owners – check out our business products.

Comments off
August 13th, 2014

avast! Mobile Security named Tabby Awards Winner and Users’ Choice

Tabby users_choice-2014 (2)The public has spoken! One hundred thousand votes were cast and avast! Mobile Security & Antivirus was declared the Winner and Users’ Choice pick for the best Utilities and Tools for Android devices.

The international panel of independent judges wrote about avast! Mobile Security, “One of the best security apps for tablets. Setup is quick and easy. UI is refreshing and simple yet functional. Capabilities and ease of use are outstanding. Very solid. This application is the complete mobile security package.”

The crowning achievement for the developers of avast! Mobile Security is the Users’ Choice award, given by real app users. In June and July, app users voted on the TabbyAwards.com site for their favorite app among panel-selected finalists in each category. The full list of Winners, Users’ Choice and Finalists, with links to download them, is available at TabbyAwards.com.

You ain’t seen nothing yet

The judges and users thought that the current version of avast! Mobile Security has a “refreshing” and “simple yet functional” user interface.  Well, it’s about to get even better!

Android Power Users: Join us as a beta tester and provide feedback on the new, improved avast! Mobile Security user interface. Visit the avast! Google+ page to join the beta community and learn how you can earn a free 1-year license for avast! Mobile Premium.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ andInstagram. Business owners – check out our business products.

Comments off
August 9th, 2014

Our pressing need for ‘now’ does not translate to a want for security breaches

instant-gratificationRecode is running a series leading from its “I want it now” piece about people who have grown accustomed to having their desires met on a whim through the aid of savvy entrepreneurs and tech innovators eager to cash in.

We can all relate to “I want it now”.

I feel myself growing impatient in coffee shops when someone has found a spot to connect their laptops or mobile devices to power points – and I have not. As we often spend hours in the one coffee shop sipping from the same latte we ordered more than an hour ago, it’s inevitable from time to time that we’ll want to check our personal affairs.

What’s happening on facebook? I should message my friend. Let’s browse my favorite news and music sites – that concert looks good, I think I’ll buy a ticket. What, my credit card has been rejected? Best do some online banking.

This type of activity in public spaces can be open playing field for the ill-intentioned: The hacker or the “steal your data” money or identity thief.

We would all agree the “I want it now” mentality does not include: ‘I want’ cyber snoops and criminals ‘now’.

We’ve heard the warnings about our mobile devices – the smartphone is a walking computer in your back pocket, and yet one that can easily be lost or stolen. The plethora of text messages, contact lists, photos, online search history – all this information can be found and used against us if it falls into the wrong hands – even when wiped (as our recent blogpost shows).

Hackers are also targeting our mobile devices with malicious malware. Read more…

Comments off
July 24th, 2014

Mobile development start-up Inmite joins AVAST team!

logo Inmite

Inmite acquisition adds 40 mobile developers to AVAST’s growing mobile business

Our 220 million AVAST users are moving many of their online activities to mobile devices, just like the rest of the world. Cybercriminals are well aware of the shift and are increasing their activities as well. In order to better protect our current and new mobile users, we are pleased to announce that we brought Inmite, a mobile application development firm, into the AVAST family.

Through this acquisition, we are adding 40 very talented and experienced mobile developers to our growing mobile business.

“Inmite’s team consists of great mobile developers and by joining AVAST, they’re going to further accelerate our growth and expand our capabilities across mobile platforms,” said Vince Steckler, CEO at AVAST.

Inmite has built more than 150 mobile iOS, Android and Windows Phone apps for the automotive, banking, media and telecommunications industries since 2008. The company is recognized as a Top Developer on Google Play, and also developed the world’s first Google Glass banking prototype, and other ‘internet of things’ devices.

“In order to make a greater impact worldwide, we wanted to go big with a global mobile leader who believes in technologies for the future. AVAST shares this vision and is the ideal partner for us,” said Barbora Petrová, spokesperson of Inmite.

Read more on VentureBeat, Avast acquires Czech mobile dev shop Inmite, and in the official press release.

AVAST Software acquires Inmite mobile development start-up

Avast co-founders Eduard Kucera and Pavel Baudiš take a Selfie with Inmite company founders.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram. Business owners – check out our business products.

July 17th, 2014

Tinybanker Trojan targets banking customers

Tinba Trojan specifically targets bank customers with deceitful debt notice.

The Tinba Trojan is banking malware that uses a social engineering technique called spearfishing to target its victims. Recently, targets have been banking customers in Czech Republic, AVAST Software’s home country. Tinba, aka Tiny Banker or Tinybanker,  was first reported in 2012 where it was active in Turkey. A whitepaper analyzing its functionality is available here (PDF). However, the spam campaigns against bank users in Czech Republic are still going on and have became more intensive. Here is an example of what Czech customers recently found in their email inbox.

Czech version:

VÝZVA K ÚHRADĚ DLUŽNÉHO PLNĚNÍ PŘED PROVEDENÍM EXEKUCE

Soudní exekutor Mgr. Bednář, Richard, Exekutorský úřad Praha-2, IČ 51736937, se sídlem Kateřinská 13, 184 00 Praha 2
pověřený provedením exekuce: č.j. 10 EXE 197/2014 -17, na základě exekučního titulu: Příkaz č.j. 077209/2014-567/Čen/G V.vyř.,
vás ve smyslu §46 odst. 6 z. č. 120/2001 Sb. (exekuční řád) v platném znění vyzývá k splnění označených povinností, které ukládá exekuční titul, jakož i povinnosti uhradit náklady na nařízení exekuce a odměnu soudního exekutora, stejně ták, jako zálohu na náklady exekuce a odměnu soudního exekutora:

Peněžitý nárok oprávněného včetně nákladu k dnešnímu dni: 9 027,00 Kč
Záloha na odměnu exekutora (peněžité plnění): 1 167,00 Kč včetně DPH 21%
Náklady exekuce paušálem: 4 616,00 Kč včetně DPH 21%

Pro splnění veškerých povinností  je třeba uhradit na účet soudního exekutora (č.ú. 549410655/5000, variabilní symbol 82797754, ČSOB a.s.), ve lhůtě 15 dnů od
doručení této výzvy 14 810,00 Kč

Nebude-li  uvedená částka uhrazena ve lhůtě 15 dnů od doručení této výzvy, bude i provedena exekuce majetku a/nebo zablokován bankovní účet  povinného ve smyslu § 44a odst. 1 EŘ a podle § 47 odst. 4 EŘ. Až do okamžiku splnění povinnosti.

Příkaz k úhradě, vyrozumění o zahájení exekuce  a vypučet povinnosti najdete v přiložených souborech.

Za správnost vyhotovení Alexey Mishkel

 

English translation:

Distraint notice
———————
Bailiff [Academic title] [First name] [Last name], Distraint office Prague-2 ID: 51736937 at Katerinska 13, 184 00 Prague 2 was authorized to proceed the execution 10 EXE 197/2014 -17 based on execution Order 077209/2014-567/Cen/G according to §46 paragraph 4, 120/2001 law collection in valid form which impose you to pay these costs:

Debt amount: 9,027.00 CZK ($445.00)
Distraint reward: 1,167 including 21% TAX
Fixed costs: 4,616 CZK including 21% TAX
Total: 14,810 CZK ($730.00)

To bank account 549410655/5000, variable symbol 82797754, CSOB a.s.

For the correctness of the copy warrants Alexey Mishkel

Using the spearfishing social engineering tactic, the attackers attempt to scare their victims with a specially designed email message explaining that a debt exists which needs to be paid.

Read more…

July 11th, 2014

Six ways to secure your smartphone

AR AMSpost-enI bet you would be lost without your smartphone. It’s your lifeline to contacts, emails, and personal information, not to mention all those apps that you use for fun, entertainment, and business. You probably have bought something using your phone, so your credit card information is there, as well as your account log ins. In other words, it would be disastrous to lose it to a thief or be infected with a data-stealing app.

Keep reading for some solid tips that will help you secure your Android smartphones and tablets.

1. Install security software

Protect your smartphone or tablet from malicious attacks. Malware targeted at Android devices is increasing daily, and we project that it will be at PC levels in the next 4 years. Even though malware is not likely to affect you (yet), avast! Mobile Security & Anti-theft protects your device , plus it helps you locate your device if it is lost or stolen.

TIP: When you upgrade to avast! Mobile Premium you get a feature called Password Check. This feature keeps nosy people and data thieves from snooping around your messages or emails. After 3 wrong attempts to break in, your phone is locked.

2. Use trusted stores to install apps

Malware may not be a huge threat yet, but cybercrooks are using apps in subtle ways, so you need to be aware of what you’re downloading onto your device. The major app stores like Google Play and Amazon are the safest places to go for apps. These have rigorous vetting procedures, so they are reliable sources. The ones you need to watch out for are the unregulated third party app stores predominantly from the Asia or the Middle East.

TIP: For an extra safeguard on your Android device, stop the installation of apps from unknown sources. Go to Settings>Security and uncheck the Unknown Sources option. Check the Verify Apps option to block or warn you before installing apps that may cause harm.

3. Use a PIN or password and lock your apps

Your Android phone has its own security settings, so we recommend that you set a PIN number with a strong number code to the lock screen. To set your PIN go to Settings>Lock screen to set a pattern or passcode.

TIP: Use avast! Mobile Security App Lock to set a PIN for apps you want to keep private, like online shopping and banking apps. You can lock any two apps with a PIN/gesture using our free product; get unlimited app locking with the Premium product.

Read more…

July 9th, 2014

Android Forensics, Part 1: How we recovered (supposedly) erased data

Introduction to Android forensics (aka CSI: Android)

Digital forensics is a branch of science which deals with the recovery and investigation of materials found in digital devices. Forensics is usually mentioned in connection with crime, vaguely similar to criminal investigations on TV shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and NCIS. However, several experiments (1, 2), including this one, use methods of digital forensics as proof that people do not pay attention to what happens with their personal data when replacing their digital devices (computers, hard drives, cell phones). In this blog post series we will reveal what we managed to dig out from supposedly erased devices. The sensitive information includes pictures (even very private ones!), videos, contacts, SMS messages, Facebook chat logs, Google searches, GPS location coordinates, and more.

What happens to the file when it is “deleted”

When people want to delete a file, most will use the standard features that come with their operating system. After it’s done, they consider the unwanted data to be gone forever. However, this is not true. When a file is deleted, the operating system merely deletes the corresponding pointers in the file table and marks the space occupied by the file as free. The reality is that the file is not deleted and the data it contained still remains on the drive. With regular usage of the drive, the remaining data will sooner or later be overwritten with different data. The same thing happens on your PC.

The following screenshots show the scenario. We used the program FTK Imager to mount the image of a partition containing user data. The first figure shows a [root] directory followed by [unallocated space]. Although all the sensitive files were deleted in the regular way, something still remained in unallocated space. In this particular example, we managed to dump 251 blocks of unallocated data and to recover interesting messages, for example from a Facebook chat. The seller of this HTC Sensation cell phone thought that his personal was cleared out, but the figures below show that he/she was tragically mistaken.

ftk_imager Read more…