Jason Mashak

13 October 2011

Profiling facebook spammers

I've seen this happen many times, but this time I decided to get a screenshot of it. In a small box, facebook recommends that I add a friend because we have friends in common... or I get a direct friend request from someone I don't know. I click the profile to investigate and, indeed, we have several friends in common. But an instinct triggers that something isn't quite right.

Example 1 - Notice:

  1. New profile
  2. No personal information other than "Single"
  3. Only 17 friends
  4. All 17 friends are male
  5. Only 1 photo, with a focal point of breasts and eyes (maybe I should have titled this post "Why men are easy targets for spammers")





Example 2 - Notice:

  1. New profile
  2. No personal information
  3. Only 5 friends
  4. No friends in common





Occasionally, I will go ahead and accept a direct request even though I suspect it to be a fake spammer account. Once I have 'friend' access to see all wall posts, etc., and can confirm my suspicions, I then quickly delete the person. Partly I do this to be aware of what techniques people are using for their less-than-productive endeavors, and partly I do it because... I'm curious. ;)

My point is this: If 'common sense' were actually common, these spammers would have nobody to prey upon. That said, if something seems suspicious/odd/out of the ordinary on the WWW (in other words, if before the WWW you didn't have a lot of beautiful strangers calling you, wanting to be friends), then please... think before you click. At worst, you'll lose a minute or two of time to be sure -- at best, you could prevent crashing a PC and spreading trouble to all your friends.



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