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Posts Tagged ‘trojan’
September 11th, 2013

Fake Antivirus Android application discovered

AVAST virus lab analyst Filip Chytrý has discovered a fake Android Antivirus application impersonating avast! Free Mobile Security.  The malicious application called com.avastmenow has a user interface that looks very similar to the genuine one by AVAST Software. After the installation of the fake program, an icon with the text of PornHub is displayed to users.  The Trojan displays fake alert pop ups in an attempt to convince the user he is infected even when he is not. Users who download the fake application might end up with their Smartphone device blocked and be requested to pay 100$ to unlock the phone.

Our virus lab specialists are currently working on samples, so the AVAST virus database will be updated shortly. The goal is to protect all avast! Antivirus users and prevent them from downloading the malicious application. We will update our community on the progress here and on our social media channels.

Meanwhile we recommend all users to use trusted source and download avast! free Mobile Security only from here.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun, and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ and Instagram.

August 27th, 2013

Linux Trojan “Hand of Thief” ungloved

A new threat for the Linux platform was first mentioned on August 7th by RSA researchers, where it was dubbed Hand of Thief.  The two main capabilities of this Trojan are form-grabbing of Linux-specific browsers and entering a victim’s computer by a back-door. Moreover, it is empowered with features like anti-virtualization and anti-monitoring. With the level of overall sophistication Hand of Thief displays, it can be compared to infamous non-Windows threats such as the FlashBack Trojan for MacOsX platform discovered last year or Trojan Obad for Android from recent times.

A detailed analysis uncovers the following structure of the initial file with all parts after the dropper being encrypted (hexadecimal number displays starting offset of a block):

handofthief_scheme

Read more…

August 14th, 2013

AVAST detects and blocks 100% of Zeus Trojans in Banking Security Test

MRG Effitas certificationavast! Internet Security detects and blocks 100% of the world’s most malicious Zeus Trojan strains.

The Zeus Trojan is the most prevalent type of financial malware. Zeus infects a user’s computer and lies in wait until the user logs on to a banking website. Once that occurs, it attempts to steal the user’s bank account information, passwords, and other personal information. This summer Zeus made its way to Facebook, showing how it can evolve to avoid detection and circumvent countermeasures employed by banks and security vendors.

This dangerous Trojan is detected by avast! Antivirus. In a recent simulation for MRG Effitas Online Banking / Browser Security Assessment Project,  avast! Internet Security prevented the simulator from capturing user data and detected and blocked results for the 100 Zeus samples, all from live URLs. The same top-rated antivirus and anti-malware protection is available in all AVAST products, including avast! Free Antivirus.

Protect your online identity while securing your sensitive online financial transactions by using avast! Internet Security.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun, and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ and Instagram.

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June 6th, 2013

Facebook virus empties bank accounts

ZeuS Trojan

A dangerous Trojan named ZeuS is making its way among Facebook users. This old Trojan horse has infected millions of computers over the years, stealing banking credentials and other personally identifiable information. Zeus can lie dormant on infected computers until the unsuspecting victim logs into their bank’s website. Once you’re logged in, cybercrooks can steal your log in credentials and empty your account without your knowledge.

The virus is spread through phishing messages either from a funny or shocking video from a friend posted on their page or in a message to you, or through an ad for videos or products. If you click the link to watch the video, a notification will say that you need to update the player. When you click update, you are actually downloading the Trojan. Clicking the Play button automatically gives your “Like” to the virus page, and it’s through this action that the link will spread to all of your friends.

All avast! Antivirus products detect and block Zeus if a user tries to install or run the .exe file, but the best way to protect yourself is to avoid it! avast! SafeZone is recommended for safe banking, financial transactions, and shopping online. It gives you a private, secure, and isolated desktop which keeps you safe from keyloggers like the ZeuS Trojan. avast! SafeZone is available in avast! Pro, avast! Internet Security, and avast! Premier.

 

Please share this with your family and friends.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun, and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter,  Google+ and Instagram.

November 28th, 2011

R2D2 – Forget the jargon, it’s a wiretap

A short time ago in a galaxy very close by, the German Police and their R2D2 Trojan gave us a simple reminder of what modern malware is all about. It’s wiretapping.

Technical buzzwords usually leave me more puzzled than enlightened. How many of these terms can you identify: backdoor Trojan with mfc42ul.dll, winsys32.sys key logger, Speex codec, full registry access, CJPEG, or acrd~tmp~.exe for a hidden executed application.

Did I lose you? Just think wiretapping in the digital age.

Recently, the German Police had their R2D2 outed by the Chaos Computer Club. It seems that after the Police loaded their R2D2 Trojan onto a suspect’s computer, the defenders of law and order could do the following: Read more…

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October 14th, 2011

All in the Family with malware

It’s easy to get an “older sister” bit of malware on your computer – even if you don’t want one. Just practice a little “unsafe computing” with four easy steps as outlined by AVAST Virus Lab analyst Michal Krejdl in his recent blog post. As he put it: “She’s a little bit binary, but nobody has a perfect sister, hmm?”

To pick up your own “older sister”, just do the following: Read more…

July 29th, 2009

What to imagine behind Win32:MalOb [Cryp]

Our users are sometimes confused what can some malware name mean. In fact – there are some names without an special meaning – they are mostly related to short-lived pieces of malware. Contrary to this daily stuff there are some malware families (long-lived, widespread or highly dangerous), which should have some unique name. One of the reasons could be the possibility of effective seeking through the results of search engines (check the difference when you type “Win32:Trojan-gen” and “Win32:Fasec” in your search engine). There’s not a mandatory naming convention applicable to all AV vendors. Our names contain these parts:

- platform (or file type) prefix

- malware name

- malware type

Read more…

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