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Posts Tagged ‘survey’
September 16th, 2014

‘Win iPhone 6’ scams fool Facebook users, pad scammers pockets

It only took Apple 24 hours to get 4 million pre-orders of the new iPhone 6, and scammers were right there with them to cash in.

FB iPhone 6 scam

This example of a like-harvesting scam page promises an iPhone 6 giveaway.

In the newest iteration of a scam used every time a new product is launched with fanfare, Facebook pages have been popping up claiming that people who like, share, and comment on a post can win an iPhone 6.

This type of scam is referred to as like-harvesting. The scammer makes the page popular by collecting likes and then sells the page to other scammers. The offer of a new device, like the iPhone 6, entices people to click the like button then spam their friends with the bogus promotion. Thousands of likes can accumulate within a few hours, making the page quite valuable on the black market. The new owner rebrands it to peddle more questionable products and services with their built-in audience.

A variation on this scam is the Survey Scam. As with like-harvesting, you must first like the Facebook page. The difference is that you need to also share a link with your Facebook friends.

This link takes you to a page where you are instructed to download a “Participation Application.” Generally, a pop-up window leads you to participate in a survey before you can download the application. Some surveys will ask for personal information like your mobile phone number or name and address. If you provide those details, you open yourself up to expensive text-messaging services, annoying phone calls, and junk mail. In some cases, the download contains malicious code. The only thing you can be guaranteed not to get is an iPhone 6! Meanwhile, the scammer earns money for every survey through an affiliate marketing scheme.

What to do if you liked a ‘Win iPhone 6′ page

If you fell for the scam, then learn from it and don’t do it again! Make sure you unlike the page, delete comments that you made, and remove the post from your news feed. You may also want to alert your friends to the scams, so they don’t fall for it.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+. Business owners – check out our business products.

September 3rd, 2014

Survey shows the person you trust the most may be spying on you

People expect that they are being watched online in cyberspace, but who would expect to be spied on by the people closest to them? You better watch out – your partner may be spying on you more than the NSA: One in five men and one in four women admitted to checking their partner’s smartphone in a survey with 13,132 respondents conducted by AVAST in the United States.

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Playing detective

The survey found that while the majority of women check their partner’s device because they are nosey, a quarter of married women suspect their spouse is cheating on them and want to find evidence.

Married women are not the only ones who suspect their partner is cheating on them. The reason why most men pry on their partner is because they too are afraid their better half is being unfaithful and want to confirm their suspicions – especially if the relationship is fresh.

Caught red handed

One may think that people who snoop on their significant other to find evidence of cheating or lying are being paranoid. Unfortunately, the majority of them are not paranoid–their gut feeling is often correct. Seven out of ten women and more than half of men who turn to their partner’s device to find proof their partner is deceiving them, have found evidence. Which of the two sexes is more likely to confront their partner regarding their findings? Women. The survey revealed that women are 20% more likely than men to confront their partner with the facts.

“Picking” the mobile lock

Cracking their partner’s device passcode wasn’t necessary for the greater number of snoopers. A shockingly high percentage of respondents claimed they didn’t need a passcode to gain entry to their significant other’s device. Women did, however, have an easier time with 41% reporting their partner’s device did not have a passcode compared to the 33% of men. Coming in at a high second, both male and female respondents claimed to know their partner’s device passcode because their partner had shared it with them in the past, unknowingly setting themselves up to get caught. Read more…

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August 26th, 2014

U.S. schools give an F to 2014-15 IT budget

AVAST Free For Education saves school IT money

AVAST Free for Education protects schools while significantly decreasing IT costs for security.

The beginning of the 2014/2015 school year is here. Parents and children are ready after a long summer break, but are schools prepared for the start of the new academic year?

AVAST surveyed more than 900 school IT professionals who participate in the AVAST Free for Education program and found that in terms of technology, schools are not as well equipped as parents expect.

  • 8 out of every 10 schools surveyed by AVAST said they do not feel they have adequate funding to keep up-to-date with technologies
  • 1 out of 5 schools still run Windows XP, and 12% of these schools said they do not intend to upgrade the unsupported operating system

Failing to upgrade to the most up-to-date software not only makes machines vulnerable to attacks, but also hinders the amount of programs that can be used by teachers and students. Keeping up with the most current technology is vital, as it has become ubiquitous in daily life, making it a valuable skill for children to have for the future. Despite technology’s important place in education,

  • 4 out of 10 school’s IT budgets are slashed for the upcoming school year
  • More than a quarter of schools have a $0 IT budget for this year

Technology in schools is not limited to instruction. Sensitive information about faculty, staff, and students is stored on administrative computers. This information needs to be protected from cybercriminals, which is difficult for schools with little to no IT budget. Schools without adequate protection put local families, faculty, and expensive hardware at risk.

AVAST Free for Education helps schools by providing them with enterprise-grade antivirus protection for free, saving school districts an average of $14,285 a year. The AVAST Free for Education program saves school IT departments money they can spend on software and hardware upgrades or use for supplies and salaries.

EDU infograph August 2014

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April 7th, 2014

New AVAST survey shows people not so smart with smartphone security.

Smartphone owners are careless about security, says survey.

Guys are more likely to get a virus on their smartphone than girls (36% vs 32%), and more than one third (34%) of survey respondents don’t have any anti-theft or antivirus security on their smartphones. Add to that nearly half of the people AVAST polled in the US said they did not back up their data or know if they did on their mobile devices. This is despite nearly one in ten saying they had lost their phone or it was stolen in the last 12 months. These results are from a recent smartphone survey conducted for antivirus software company, AVAST.

AVAST Software mobile security survey

AVAST surveyed 9,060 people earlier this year in the US about smartphone ownership and use and have released the results today. Read more…

September 4th, 2013

96% of US schools facing huge cost of Windows XP upgrades

blog_image_XPIn a recent survey, we found that over 96%[1] of schools in the United States are likely to face a major technology crisis in the new year when Windows XP will no longer be supported by Microsoft. Educational institutions of all sizes around the world are going to have to foot the bill of upgrading not only their operating system but also their hardware.

Schools that don’t upgrade to a new operating system by the April 2014 cut-off could be at risk. The withdrawal of support means that there will be no updates such as security patches, driver refreshes, or bug fixes — all of which are essential for networked personal computers, where protection of children and information is especially important.

At AVAST, we took a closer look at the costs schools will face: The cost of upgrading from Windows XP to a more recent operating system is approximately $200 per computer and it is not likely to stop there. Many schools are also facing the expense of upgrading their hardware as well since hardware older than three years is unlikely to be able to support Windows 7 and beyond. The cost to schools in this situation could run into tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of dollars.

To help alleviate some of the burden, we created the Free for Education program which provides bullet-proof antivirus protection completely free to schools in the United States. Institutions can save an average of more than $14,000 USD per year by taking advantage of this program.

A great example of how AVAST’s Free for Education has benefited a local school system is the ABC Unified School District in Cerritos, California. With the program, they have saved over $40,000 USD. “With AVAST Free for Education we were able to take some strain off of our budget,” said Joe, Machado, Network Analyst at ABC Schools. “Our savings in licensing alone will be at least $20,000 USD per year. And, our savings in time from cleaning up outbreaks from unprotected or under-protected systems is easily another $20,000 USD per year.”

Since launching in November 2012, the AVAST Free for Education program has protected over 2.8 million computers and servers belonging to over 1,800 education institutions. If you are interested in more information or to participate in the program, please visit: www.avast.com/education

[1] AVAST Software survey amongst 164 educational institutions, July 2013