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Posts Tagged ‘social networks’
October 28th, 2013

Facebook Clickjacking: Will You Like Me?

FB_meme“Who wouldn’t want to have more likes on their Facebook page?” This is the motivation of a very trivial code to get more likes, but while other methods usually comprise of adding better content or advertising, this one is a bit easier, and much dirtier. Why not show the like button directly beneath your mouse cursor as you browse a website, make it invisible, and move it as you move your mouse?

The only thing the victim has to do is click; if they are logged in to Facebook, they will automatically like the Facebook page. And of course, it is not only about the number of likes, but each like means the victim will get all the information about this page on their news feed (until they unlike the page), and all friends will also see that you like it – so why not check it out themselves?

FB_clickjack_Like_ButtonThis method is possible due to Like Button, a social plugin for Facebook, made by Facebook developers. It is used properly on many legitimate sites, but when combined with CSS hiding and JS moving, the victim has no other chance. If you want to know how to minimize the impact of such tactics, or if you are more into technical details, read on.

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September 17th, 2013

How your social networks can hurt you during a job hunt

In a blog post published back in June, we shared the stories of a few unfortunate people who were fired from their jobs or passed over for a job promotion because of over-sharing on social networks. If you are looking for a job and wonder why you are not getting a call back, it could be because of what’s on your Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ profiles.

A new survey from Jobvite says that more than 90% of HR managers and recruiters report reviewing job candidates’ social profiles during the hiring process. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn are still the recruiters social networks of choice – but they are also looking through blogs, YouTube channels, Yammer, Instagram and other networks to source talent. Based on what they find, 42% of companies said they reconsidered hiring candidates.

Posts related to illegal drug use and those of a sexual nature met with universal disapproval. Profanity, and grammar and punctuation errors in posts and tweets trigger negative reactions among recruiters over 60% of the time. On the other hand, posts which share your volunteering gigs or donations to charity give recruiters a positive feeling about hiring you.

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Read our tips on giving your social profiles a makeover during job hunting time.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+.

September 6th, 2013

What’s Hot on Social: Security and privacy update

Millions of users access social networks every day in order to share, engage, and look for information as well as entertainment. The transparency of social networks come with a risk and we very often expose ourselves to hackers and scammers that can take advantage of information we share. Social platforms constantly improve security and privacy settings, to deliver a safe experience to the users, but who has time to follow all this news? Well, you can relax and rely on us. AVAST specialists are here to deliver this information in an accessible way.

Last month we prepared a security and privacy update following the most important changes on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Check what has changed since than to enjoy a secure social media experience!

shutterstock_113587513Facebook updated its Privacy policy   

At the end of August, Facebook chief privacy officer Erin Egan published an official blog post, as a response to rumors and extensive discussion on the company’s Data Use Policy. One of the biggest concerns were related to how Facebook displays our data to its clients advertising on the social network. Currently pages can target us even by our name.

Advertisers may also be able to reach you on Facebook using the information they already have about you (such as email addresses or whether you have visited their websites previously).

#AVASTtip: There is not much space for us users to really influence it, but Facebook is open to user feedback. If you would like to comment or express your opinion, you can do it here .

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June 24th, 2013

#useAVAST winners share recommendations with friends

Our first #useAVAST” Hashtag challenge is over and it’s time to announce the results. As always, YOU have proven what an engaged and creative community AVAST has. We’ve seen plenty of Facebook and Google+ posts and Tweets with your personal recommendations. It has convinced us that we should be giving you this opportunity more often, so Be free to expect some more fun.

As announced in the previous blog, we have selected winners in two categories:

  • Most creative/funny recommendation
  • Most convincing recommendation

All entries are valuable to us and we appreciate your inventiveness and always-willing-to-participate attitude! Congratulations to the winners! Please contact us at winners@avast.com to claim your 1-year license for avast! Premiere, our best-selling antivirus protection.

Most funny/creative

 

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June 4th, 2013

New High School and College Grads – Read This!

Social media profiles affects college admission, job searches, and careers

career endingA 24-year-old high school teacher in Georgia, USA, lost her job after an anonymous e-mailer complained about a Facebook picture of her sipping wine and drinking beer while on vacation in Europe. An Arizona woman was fired after ranting on Facebook when she was passed over for a job promotion. An 18-year-old Buckingham Palace guard was fired after he called Kate Middleton a ‘stupid stuck up cow’ in a Facebook post. A star high school football recruit lost his scholarship to the University of Michigan because of vulgar tweets.

By now, you know that you should not reveal personal information to strangers or on your Facebook profiles, and that you should utilize the privacy settings on social networking sites.  You also need to be careful with what you are posting online because potential employers or college admission officers could be looking at your page.

A newly published report tells us that 1 in 10 people between ages 16 and 34 have been turned down for a new job because of photos or comments on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and other social networking sites. “The majority (two-thirds) are not concerned that their use of social media now, may harm their future career prospects and are not deterred from using it,” states ondevice research,  “They are also more likely to have altered their social media profile to look good to their friends, as opposed to prospective employers.”

 

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If you can’t live without social networking, especially Facebook, during your job search, use it to your advantage.

  • Give your profile a makeover. Prune old posts to highlight what’s great about you instead of what you ate for lunch in 2010. Either delete or restrict the view to images and albums that don’t show you in your best light. Get a handle on tagged photos by setting ‘Review Posts Friends Tag You in Before They Appear on Your Timeline.’
  • Build a compelling professional profile. Show off your strengths and accomplishments. To keep it personal as well as professional, add interests, hobbies, volunteering, educational information, and professional pictures.
  • Follow and engage with companies and career–related groups on LinkedIn and Twitter so you’ll know about company hires and other news.
  • Add value to the company you are interested in by participating in conversations, answering questions, and sharing links. Make sure you use solid grammar and communication skills.

If your Facebook profile is beyond help, then consider deactivating it for a time. The deactivation option gives you the flexibility to leave and come back whenever you want. Select Account Settings>Click Security in the left-hand column>Click Deactivate your account.

Thank you for using avast! Antivirus and recommending us to your friends and family. For all the latest news, fun and contest information, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Google+.

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May 11th, 2013

#avastBeFree: AVAST is looking for its next Photo Contest Winners!

One year ago, Avast launched avast! Free Antivirus for Mac, and celebrated with our first photo contest. The results were outstanding – we received 50,000 photos with “APPLE” as the topic, and  our Facebook page became the 5th fastest growing page worldwide during the first week of the competition!

Your enthusiatic reponse told us that:

  • You are playful
  • You like to compete for nice prizes
  • You love social media and avast 

Enter our new Photo Contest and Win!

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We are happy to introduce a new photo contest. This time, however, we leave it up to your creativity. Your assigment is simple: Show us your creativity and visual interpretation of our slogan avast! Be free!

To make it even easier,  this time you can enter not only via Facebook, but also upload your best photo via Twitter and Instagram using the #avastBeFree hashtag.

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March 16th, 2012

Music to our ears

We like to think that the avast! voice telling us that our virus database has been updated is almost like a pleasant song, something to cheer us all up, reminding us that nobody needs to sing the PC blues.

So it’s great to know we’re not alone, and that our users also think this way. Here’s an example by “Ferrett Steinmetz,” an Ohio-based writer, who recently tweeted:

A quick read down Mr. Steinmetz’s twitter wall shows similar cleverisms about a large number of subjects. You can follow him on twitter @ferretthimself.

Also, feel free to change your avast! voice or even record your own avast! voices via our avast.com Community pages.

November 17th, 2011

Facebook vs. Sharks

Yes, most of us complain about all the seemingly unnecessary changes that Facebook initiates far more often than we’d like (just about the time we figure out how to navigate everything)… but it’s good to remember that Facebook is a free service. Of course some will argue that nothing is really ‘free’, but at least +140 million active avast! Community members know differently. ;)

 

Value proposition

Some of you will remember the days of Rolodex. Mine was typically overfilled with business cards and scraps of paper – taped, glued, or even stapled in place. Sometimes a few ‘creative’ oversized business cards or paper scraps would clog up the ‘machine’, and maintaining changes to phone numbers, addresses, and job titles was always a major problem.

So Facebook, for me, was a welcome change. All my contacts keep their own info updated, and I can find them at any time via the search box. And my Facebook account serves 4 key purposes:

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October 13th, 2011

Profiling facebook spammers

I’ve seen this happen many times, but this time I decided to get a screenshot of it. In a small box, facebook recommends that I add a friend because we have friends in common… or I get a direct friend request from someone I don’t know. I click the profile to investigate and, indeed, we have several friends in common. But an instinct triggers that something isn’t quite right.

Example 1 – Notice:

  1. New profile
  2. No personal information other than “Single”
  3. Only 17 friends
  4. All 17 friends are male
  5. Only 1 photo, with a focal point of breasts and eyes (maybe I should have titled this post “Why men are easy targets for spammers”)

 

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March 19th, 2010

In the cloud identity – can we protect it?

Last few years can be called a “social networking era”. Just remember the rise ups (and depressions) of myspace.com, linked.in etc. These networks are now completely shadowed by FaceBook and Twitter. Even when myspace and similar networks are not that widespread today, they were at the beginning of all. It becomes more and more usual to identify a real ego with social network profile. That’s not too dangerous in its basis, but there’s a big problem – people completely loose a sense for their privacy on internet. This is not an attitude against social networks, it’s only a thought about dangerous habits appearing with the social networking phenomenon. The risk is not the existence of social networks, the risk is how people behave there.

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