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October 27th, 2014

Pony stealer spread vicious malware using email campaign

Most people want to stay on top of their bills, and not pay them late. But recently, unexpected emails claiming an overdue invoice have been showing up in people’s inboxes, causing anxiety and ultimately a malware attack. Read this report from the Avast Virus Lab, so as a consumer you’ll know what to look for, and as a systems administrator for an SMB or other website, you will know how cybercrooks can use your site for this type of social engineering scam.

Recently we saw an email campaign which attempted to convince people to pay an overdue invoice, as you can see on the following image. The user is asked to download an invoice from the attached link.

mail1

The downloaded file pretends to be a regular PDF file, however the filename “Total outstanding invoice pdf.com” is very suspicious.

When the user executes the malicious file, after a few unpacking procedures, it downloads the final vicious payload. The Avast Virus Lab has identified this payload as Pony Stealer, a well-known data-stealing Trojan which is responsible for stealing $220,000, as you can read here.

We followed the payload URL and discovered that it was downloaded from a hacked website. The interesting part is that we found a backdoor on that site allowing the attacker to take control of  the entire website. As you can see, the attacker could create a new file and write any data to that file on the hacked website, for example, a malicious php script.

backdoor

Because that website was unsecured, cybercrooks used it to place several Pony Stealer administration panels on it, including the original installation package, and some other malware samples as well.  You can see an example of Pony Stealer panel’s help page written in the Russian language on the following picture.

panel

Avast Virus Lab advises:

For Consumers: Use extreme caution if you see an email trying to convince you to pay money for non-ordered services. This use of “social engineering” is most likely fraudulent. Do not respond to these emails.

For SMBs: If you are a server administrator, please secure your server and follow the general security recommendations. As you learned from this article,  you can be hacked and a backdoor can be put in your website allowing anyone to upload whatever he wants to your website. Protect yourself and your visitors!

SHA’s and detections:

4C893CA9FB2A6CB8555176B6F2D6FCF984832964CCBDD6E0765EA6167803461D

5C6B3F65C174B388110C6A32AAE5A4CE87BF6C06966411B2DB88D1E8A1EF056B

Avast detections: Win32:Agent-AUKT, Win32:VB-AIUM

Acknowledgement:

I would like to thank Jan Zíka for discovering this campaign.

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December 12th, 2013

Christmas time! Do you want a malware present?

DHLspoofChristmas time is essentially connected with buying presents. There’s a lot of stuff to be done and a lot of opportunities to buy a present in an e-shop to save time. Who doesn’t know someone who buys a Christmas gift online?

The malware authors know and are very keen to take advantage of it. We see scam emails containing order or delivery details every day and they have a lot of common. In fact, it’s nothing new. Such methods are used constantly during the year, it’s nothing special connected to Christmas. However, Christmas is the reason why many people might be fooled. Let’s look at them in detail.

Imagine you are customer waiting for a present to be delivered. You get anxious and check your email waiting for order details. You are probably the most vulnerable at this time. Then you get an email from DHL, the well-known parcel delivery service, with a notice saying that the shipping details are in an attachment. In that moment of relief, you click on the email attachment. It turns out to be a zip file containing a file named DHL-parcel.exe. The strange thing is the file extension looks like regular PDF file because it has the same icon. In fact, it is malware.

Read more…

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October 4th, 2012

“Stranded Traveler” scam still going strong

source: http://abcnews.go.com

It mostly happens in London, but I have seen it happen in Manila and Madrid too. My friends seem to travel a lot, and according to the tear-drenched emails, they have a tendency to get mugged. You might have seen it too – the “Stranded Traveler” message from a friend that goes something like this:

I’m writing this email with tears in my eyes, I came down to London for a program unfortunately, i was mugged at the park of the hotel where i stayed, all cash, credit and cell were stolen off me but  luckily for me i still have my passport with me, I have no access to my account. I have been to the embassy and the police here but they are not helping issue at all and my flight leaves tomorrow night but i am having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won’t let me leave until i settle the bills. Am freaked out at the moment. I need about 2,250 pounds or any amount you can lend me to sort-out the bills, i will refund you as soon as i get back home.

I remember the first time I saw the message. It alarmed me with its urgency, and I felt compelled to help my friend get out of the mess. Questions about how to wire money to her darted through my mind. But then I remembered that I had just seen her post something on Facebook hours before, and she was most definitely not in London getting mugged.

Here’s what happened: Cybercrooks hacked into my friend’s  Facebook and Yahoo accounts. They stole her identity, address books, changed her passwords, then sent out a message to all of her contacts using her email address.

This scam has happened so frequently, and there have been so many complaints, that the FBI issued a warning – over 2 years ago! Amazingly, the scam is still making its way through cyberspace (our CEO received one the other day), and the FBI says that they now have about 150,000 complaints on file. ABC’s Nightline actually answered one of the emails this summer and tracked what happened next. Read their account and watch the video here.

To avoid being a victim of this scam

  • Secure your passwords on all your email and social media accounts. If you have lots of user names and passwords to remember, you might like a password management system like avast! EasyPass.
  • Avoid clicking attachments in unknown emails.
  • If you get an email like this, call your friend to verify the authenticity of the message.
  • Scam victims should file a complaint with the FBI at www.ic3.gov.
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